21 At his boyhood home, Jesus is rejected.

1 Kings 17:1, 8–16; 2 Kings 5:1–14; Isaiah 61:1–2; Luke 4:16–30

What circumstance led to Jesus standing in the synagogue and reading from Isaiah (Luke 4:16–19)?

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How did Jesus know where to find the section in Isaiah (Luke 4:16–19)?

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Prior to hearing Jesus, who do you think the Jews thought the passage in Isaiah referred to (Isaiah 61:1–2)?

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What did Jesus mean when he said Isaiah’s words had been fulfilled that very day (Luke 4:20–21)?

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How might Jesus’ speech have been different from what people heard when he was younger (Luke 4:22)?

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What had happened to make Jesus different from the person people had known before (Luke 4:22)?

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How would people in Nazareth know what Jesus had done in Capernaum (Luke 4:23)?

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What is the meaning and significance of the proverb “physician, heal thyself” (Luke 4:23)?

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Why is a prophet not accepted in his hometown (Luke 4:23)?

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What did Jesus say the reason was for so few people being healed in Elijah’s and Elisha’s lives (Luke 4:25–27)?

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Why did the people of Nazareth become so angry that they wanted to kill one of their own citizens (Luke 4:28–30)?

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With so many people against him, dragging him to the brink of death, how did Jesus escape (Luke 4:28–30)?

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Jesus came to Nazareth, his boyhood home. As usual, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath. When he stood to read, someone handed him the scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled it and read from the place where Isaiah had written: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to comfort the brokenhearted, proclaim liberty to the captives, freedom for the oppressed, and recovery of sight for the blind—to tell those who mourn that the time of the Lord’s favor has come.

Eyewitness

Isaiah 61:1–2 The spirit of Almighty God is upon me because he has anointed me to preach the good news to the poor. He has sent me to comfort the brokenhearted, proclaim liberty to the captives, freedom for the oppressed, and recovery of sight for the blind, to tell those who mourn that the time of the Lord’s favor has come and the day of vengeance against their enemies.
Luke 4:16–19 Jesus came to Nazareth, his boyhood home. As usual, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath. When he stood to read, someone handed him the scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled it and read from the place where Isaiah had written: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to comfort the brokenhearted, proclaim liberty to the captives, freedom for the oppressed, and recovery of sight for the blind—to tell those who mourn that the time of the Lord’s favor has come.
King James

Isaiah 61:1–2 The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me; because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound; To proclaim the acceptable year of the LORD, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn;
Luke 4:16–19 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read. And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he had opened the book, he found the place where it was written, The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, To preach the acceptable year of the Lord.

He rolled up the scroll, handed it to the attendant, and sat down. Everyone looked intently at Jesus as he spoke. “This very day, that scripture has been fulfilled.”

Eyewitness

Luke 4:20–21 He rolled up the scroll, handed it to the attendant, and sat down. Everyone looked intently at Jesus as he spoke. “This very day, that scripture has been fulfilled.”
King James

Luke 4:20–21 And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears.

The people marveled at his eloquent words. “How can this be?” they said. “Isn’t he the son of Joseph?”

Eyewitness

Luke 4:22 The people marveled at his eloquent words. “How can this be?” they said. “Isn’t he the son of Joseph?”
King James

Luke 4:22 And all bare him witness, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth. And they said, Is not this Joseph’s son?

“No doubt,” Jesus said, “you will say this proverb to me: ‘Physician, heal yourself.’ You will ask me to do the same things here that you heard I did in Capernaum. Well, I can tell you for sure, no prophet is accepted in his hometown.

Eyewitness

Luke 4:23–24 “No doubt,” Jesus said, “you will say this proverb to me: ‘Physician, heal yourself.’ You will ask me to do the same things here that you heard I did in Capernaum. Well, I can tell you for sure, no prophet is accepted in his hometown.
King James

Luke 4:23–24 And he said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country. And he said, Verily I say unto you, No prophet is accepted in his own country.

“In Elijah’s day, many widows suffered from the severe famine that devastated the land during those three and a half years of drought. Yet God did not send Elijah to any of them. God sent him only to a foreigner—a widow in Zarephath in the land of Sidon. And in the time of the prophet Elisha, there were many lepers in Israel, but the only one healed was Naaman from Syria.”

Eyewitness

1 Kings 17:1 Elijah from Tishbite in Gilead said to Ahab, “As surely as I stand before the Lord God of Israel, neither dew nor rain will fall in these years, not unless I say so.
1 Kings 17:8–16 The Lord said to Elijah, Go to live at Zarephath in Sidon. I have told a widow there to give you food.
When Elijah came to the Zarephath, the widow woman was gathering of sticks at the city gate. “I beg you,” he said, “Bring me a cup of water to satisfy my thirst.” As she was leaving, he said, “Would you also bring me some bread.”
“God being my witness,” she said, “I have no bread, just some olive oil and a bit of meal in a barrel. I am gathering sticks for a fire so I can bake it for me and my son so we can eat our last meal and die.
“No problem,” Elijah said, “but before you do that, make a little cake and bring it to me. For the Lord God of Israel says, Your supply of meal and oil will never run out, not until after the Lord sends rain.
The widow did exactly as Elijah had asked, so he and her family had enough to eat for a long time. The barrel of meal never became empty, and the supply of oil never ran dry, exactly as the Lord had promised.
2 Kings 5:1–14 Naaman, captain of the Syria armies, was greatly admired and honored by the king because the Lord had used this mighty man of valor to defeat Syria’s enemies. He was also a leper. In one of their invasions, the Syrians captured a girl who became Naaman’s wife’s servant.
The girl said to her mistress, “If your husband would see the prophet in Samaria, he would be healed of his leprosy.”
When Naaman repeated these words, the king of Syria said, “You must go. I will send a letter to the king of Israel.”
So Naaman left with great riches–750 pounds of silver, 150 pounds of gold, ten changes of clothing. The letter to the king of Israel said, With this letter, I have sent my servant Naaman so you can cure him of his leprosy.
After reading the letter, the king of Israel tore his clothes. “Am I God, having power over life and death? You should know that the king of Syria wants only to make war against me.”
It just so happened that God’s prophet Elisha heard about the king tearing his clothes and sent this message: Why have you torn your clothes? Send the leper to me, and he will know that there is a prophet in Israel.
So Naaman went with his horses and chariot and stood outside the door of Elisha’s house.
Elisha sent his servant out to him, saying, “Go wash in the Jordan River seven times, and you will be healed.”
Naaman was wroth and rode away. “I thought the prophet would come to me and call on the name of the Lord his God. Then he would wave his hand and cause me to recover. Aren’t the Abana and Pharpar rivers of Damascus cleaner than all the waters of Israel? Why can’t I wash in them and be clean?”
His servants went to him and said, “Master, if the prophet had asked you to do something extraordinary, wouldn’t you have done it? Why not then do this simple thing and be healed?”
Then Naaman went down to the Jordan River and dipped himself according to what God’s prophet said he must do. When he rose from the water the seventh time, his flesh was as clean as a little child.
Luke 4:25–27 “In Elijah’s day, many widows suffered from the severe famine that devastated the land during those three and a half years of drought. Yet God did not send Elijah to any of them. God sent him only to a foreigner—a widow in Zarephath in the land of Sidon. And in the time of the prophet Elisha, there were many lepers in Israel, but the only one healed was Naaman from Syria.”
King James

1 Kings 17:1 And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilead, said unto Ahab, As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word.
1 Kings 17:8–16 And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying, Arise, get thee to Zarephath, which belongeth to Zidon, and dwell there: behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee.
So he arose and went to Zarephath. And when he came to the gate of the city, behold, the widow woman was there gathering of sticks: and he called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink. And as she was going to fetch it, he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.
And she said, As the Lord thy God liveth, I have not a cake, but an handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse: and, behold, I am gathering two sticks, that I may go in and dress it for me and my son, that we may eat it, and die.
And Elijah said unto her, Fear not; go and do as thou hast said: but make me thereof a little cake first, and bring it unto me, and after make for thee and for thy son. For thus saith the Lord God of Israel, The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.
And she went and did according to the saying of Elijah: and she, and he, and her house, did eat many days. And the barrel of meal wasted not, neither did the cruse of oil fail, according to the word of the Lord, which he spake by Elijah.
2 Kings 5:1–14 Now Naaman, captain of the host of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, and honourable, because by him the Lord had given deliverance unto Syria: he was also a mighty man in valour, but he was a leper. And the Syrians had gone out by companies, and had brought away captive out of the land of Israel a little maid; and she waited on Naaman’s wife.
And she said unto her mistress, Would God my lord were with the prophet that is in Samaria! for he would recover him of his leprosy.
And one went in, and told his lord, saying, Thus and thus said the maid that is of the land of Israel.
And the king of Syria said, Go to, go, and I will send a letter unto the king of Israel.
And he departed, and took with him ten talents of silver, and six thousand pieces of gold, and ten changes of raiment. And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying, Now when this letter is come unto thee, behold, I have therewith sent Naaman my servant to thee, that thou mayest recover him of his leprosy.
And it came to pass, when the king of Israel had read the letter, that he rent his clothes, and said, Am I God, to kill and to make alive, that this man doth send unto me to recover a man of his leprosy? wherefore consider, I pray you, and see how he seeketh a quarrel against me.
And it was so, when Elisha the man of God had heard that the king of Israel had rent his clothes, that he sent to the king, saying, Wherefore hast thou rent thy clothes? let him come now to me, and he shall know that there is a prophet in Israel.
So Naaman came with his horses and with his chariot, and stood at the door of the house of Elisha.
And Elisha sent a messenger unto him, saying, Go and wash in Jordan seven times, and thy flesh shall come again to thee, and thou shalt be clean.
But Naaman was wroth, and went away, and said, Behold, I thought, He will surely come out to me, and stand, and call on the name of the Lord his God, and strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper. Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? may I not wash in them, and be clean? So he turned and went away in a rage.
And his servants came near, and spake unto him, and said, My father, if the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it? how much rather then, when he saith to thee, Wash, and be clean?
Then went he down, and dipped himself seven times in Jordan, according to the saying of the man of God: and his flesh came again like unto the flesh of a little child, and he was clean.
Luke 4:25–27 But I tell you of a truth, many widows were in Israel in the days of Elias, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when great famine was throughout all the land; But unto none of them was Elias sent, save unto Sarepta, a city of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow. And many lepers were in Israel in the time of Eliseus the prophet; and none of them was cleansed, saving Naaman the Syrian.

When the people heard this, they became a furious mob. They dragged him out of the synagogue, through the town, and to the brow of the hill on which the town was built. They intended to push him over the cliff, but he walked right through the crowd and went on his way.

Eyewitness

Luke 4:28–30 When the people heard this, they became a furious mob. They dragged him out of the synagogue, through the town, and to the brow of the hill on which the town was built. They intended to push him over the cliff, but he walked right through the crowd and went on his way.
King James

Luke 4:28–30 And all they in the synagogue, when they heard these things, were filled with wrath, And rose up, and thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill whereon their city was built, that they might cast him down headlong. But he passing through the midst of them went his way,