101 Jesus teaches about prayer.

Luke 18:1–14

In Jesus’ story, why wouldn’t the woman give up (Luke 18:1–5)?

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How do we know God is a better listener than the judge who wouldn’t hear the woman’s case (Luke 18:6–8)?

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What does faith and justice have to do with Jesus’ return (Luke 18:8)?

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Why was the tax collector’s perception of himself better than the Pharisee’s (Luke 18:9–14)?

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What is the difference between being humble and being humbled (Luke 18:9–14)?

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To illustrate their need to always pray and never give up, Jesus told a story, saying, “There was a judge in town who did not fear God and had no respect for people. A woman in his town kept coming to him and begging, ‘Give me justice against the one who has done me harm.’ At first, he refused to hear her case, but he eventually changed his mind. He said to himself, ‘I do not fear God or care about people, but this woman keeps pestering me. If I do not do something, she will wear me out with her endless pleas. Therefore, I will hear her case and give her the justice she wants.’

Eyewitness

Luke 18:1–5 To illustrate their need to always pray and never give up, Jesus told a story, saying, “There was a judge in town who did not fear God and had no respect for people. A woman in his town kept coming to him and begging, ‘Give me justice against the one who has done me harm.’ At first, he refused to hear her case, but he eventually changed his mind. He said to himself, ‘I do not fear God or care about people, but this woman keeps pestering me. If I do not do something, she will wear me out with her endless pleas. Therefore, I will hear her case and give her the justice she wants.’
King James

Luke 18:1–5 And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint; Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man: And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary. And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man; Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.

“Consider how the unrighteous judge responded. Don’t you know that God, who cares for his people, will hear the case and bring justice to those who cry to him day and night? He will not put them off forever. I am telling you, he will bring justice, and soon. But when the Son of Man comes, will he find such persistent faith on the earth?”

Eyewitness

Luke 18:6–8 “Consider how the unrighteous judge responded. Don’t you know that God, who cares for his people, will hear the case and bring justice to those who cry to him day and night? He will not put them off forever. I am telling you, he will bring justice, and soon. But when the Son of Man comes, will he find such persistent faith on the earth?”
King James

Luke 18:6–8 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith. And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them? I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?

He gave an illustration for those who trusted in themselves, were confident in their own goodness, and despised others. “Two men went to pray at the Temple. One was a Pharisee, the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like others who are greedy, dishonest, and unfaithful. I thank you that I am nothing like that tax collector over there. Twice a week, I fast, and I never fail to give you a tenth of my income.’ The tax collector stood in the distance, away from other people, and would not so much as look up toward heaven. In despair, he pounded his chest and prayed, ‘God, have mercy on me, for I have sinned.’ I guarantee, the tax collector had peace with God when he went home, not the Pharisee. For those who try to make themselves great will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

Eyewitness

Luke 18:9–14 He gave an illustration for those who trusted in themselves, were confident in their own goodness, and despised others. “Two men went to pray at the Temple. One was a Pharisee, the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like others who are greedy, dishonest, and unfaithful. I thank you that I am nothing like that tax collector over there. Twice a week, I fast, and I never fail to give you a tenth of my income.’ The tax collector stood in the distance, away from other people, and would not so much as look up toward heaven. In despair, he pounded his chest and prayed, ‘God, have mercy on me, for I have sinned.’ I guarantee, the tax collector had peace with God when he went home, not the Pharisee. For those who try to make themselves great will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”
King James

Luke 18:9–14 And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.