Psalm 77: Meditating on God’s Wondrous Deeds

How do we feel when we’ve cried out to God, and we’re sure he has heard us? How do we feel when we’re not sure he’s listening?

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Psalm 77:1–2 To Jeduthun, minister of music, a song of Asaph.
I cried out to God, and he heard me.
In my distress, I looked to the Lord for help. All night, I reached up to him but received no comfort.
King James
Psalm 77:1–2 <To the chief Musician, to Jeduthun, A Psalm of Asaph.> I cried unto God with my voice, even unto God with my voice; and he gave ear unto me. In the day of my trouble I sought the Lord: my sore ran in the night, and ceased not: my soul refused to be comforted.

As we meditate upon the Lord, how can we be troubled?

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Psalm 77:3–4 As I thought upon the Lord, I was troubled. In meditation, I was overwhelmed. Pause to consider my plight.
I was too distressed to sleep or say anything.
King James
Psalm 77:3–4 I remembered God, and was troubled: I complained, and my spirit was overwhelmed. Selah. Thou holdest mine eyes waking: I am so troubled that I cannot speak.

What important lessons should we learn from studying history? What kinds of history should be most important to us?

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Psalm 77:5 I thought about days long ago, the ancient times.
King James
Psalm 77:5 I have considered the days of old, the years of ancient times.

What does it mean to “open our hearts” to the Lord? How do we do that?

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Psalm 77:6 I remember what I sang in the night as I opened my heart to the Lord and my mind was filled with questions.
King James
Psalm 77:6 I call to remembrance my song in the night: I commune with mine own heart: and my spirit made diligent search.

How far should we go in questioning God?

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Psalm 77:7–9 Will the Lord ignore me forever? Will he ever show me favor? Is God’s kindness gone forever? Have his promises been cancelled? Has God forgotten how gracious he is supposed to be? In his anger, has he lost his mercy? Pause to consider that.
King James
Psalm 77:7–9 Will the Lord cast off for ever? and will he be favourable no more? Is his mercy clean gone for ever? doth his promise fail for evermore? Hath God forgotten to be gracious? hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah.

Why might it be difficult to remember God’s hand at work in our lives?

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Psalm 77:10–11 I said, “This is my weakness, to remember the years when God’s mighty hand was at work.” When I remember what the Lord has done, I marvel at the miracles long ago.
King James
Psalm 77:10–11 And I said, This is my infirmity: but I will remember the years of the right hand of the most High. I will remember the works of the LORD: surely I will remember thy wonders of old.

In what way does our meditation upon God’s miracles affect what we say to others?

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Psalm 77:12 I will meditate upon your wondrous deeds, Lord, and tell others what you have done.
King James
Psalm 77:12 I will meditate also of all thy work, and talk of thy doings.

How would you explain to someone who isn’t religious what it means for a way to be holy?

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Psalm 77:13 God, your way is holy, better than any other way. No one compares to you.
King James
Psalm 77:13 Thy way, O God, is in the sanctuary: who is so great a God as our God?

Why might it be difficult for some people to recognize God as a miracle worker?

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Psalm 77:14 You are the miracle worker, revealing your might among the people.
King James
Psalm 77:14 Thou art the God that doest wonders: thou hast declared thy strength among the people.

What proof do we have that God really did part the Red Sea, deliver his people, and destroy the Egyptian army like the Bible says?

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Psalm 77:15–20 By your mighty arm, you have saved your people, the descendants of Jacob and Joseph. Pause to consider that.
The Red Sea saw you coming, God. The waters trembled and were stirred. The clouds brought a downpour, and the skies thundered as arrows of lightning flashed. The sound roared like racing chariots and the lightning brightened the sky. The earth trembled and quaked. Your path led through the sea, through great walls of water, but your footsteps were invisible. By the hands of Moses and Aaron, you led your people across like a flock of sheep.
King James
Psalm 77:15–20 Thou hast with thine arm redeemed thy people, the sons of Jacob and Joseph. Selah.
The waters saw thee, O God, the waters saw thee; they were afraid: the depths also were troubled. The clouds poured out water: the skies sent out a sound: thine arrows also went abroad. The voice of thy thunder was in the heaven: the lightnings lightened the world: the earth trembled and shook. Thy way is in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known. Thou leddest thy people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron.