Psalm 123: Asking for God’s Mercy

When looking up to the Lord, what should we expect?

Author’s Thoughts
Author’s Insights Pending
Author’s Paraphrase
Psalm 123:1–2 A song for worship.
I look up to you, Lord, you who live in the heavens.
As servants look up to their masters and slave girls look for their mistresses’ direction, so we look for the favor of our Lord God.
King James
Psalm 123:1–2 <A Song of degrees.> Unto thee lift I up mine eyes, O thou that dwellest in the heavens. Behold, as the eyes of servants look unto the hand of their masters, and as the eyes of a maiden unto the hand of her mistress; so our eyes wait upon the Lord our God, until that he have mercy upon us.

How does the life of a Christian compare to that of a servant or slave?

Author’s Thoughts
Author’s Insights Pending
Author’s Paraphrase
Psalm 123:2 As servants look up to their masters and slave girls look for their mistresses’ direction, so we look for the favor of our Lord God.
King James
Psalm 123:2 Behold, as the eyes of servants look unto the hand of their masters, and as the eyes of a maiden unto the hand of her mistress; so our eyes wait upon the Lord our God, until that he have mercy upon us.

How much suffering is “enough”?

Author’s Thoughts
Author’s Insights Pending
Author’s Paraphrase
Psalm 123:3 Be gracious and show us kindness, Lord, for we have suffered enough.
King James
Psalm 123:3 Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy upon us: for we are exceedingly filled with contempt.

Why might the rich and proud have contempt for those who love the Lord?

Author’s Thoughts
Author’s Insights Pending
Author’s Paraphrase
Psalm 123:4 We live under the constant ridicule and contempt of the rich and proud.
King James
Psalm 123:4 Our soul is exceedingly filled with the scorning of those that are at ease, and with the contempt of the proud.